My Brand Strategist and the Large Artwork Hypothesis

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Suzette Clarke was fresh out of brand school. Seduced by the sophistication of an art market eagerly parading itself on an international stage, she rationalised that a single client on the precipice of success was a better bet than a stable of unknowns. I cannot tell you who approached whom, but Suzette was easily conscripted to his concept that seemed to riskily engage in critique of the very market in which they both wished to participate. (As an aside, I’d like to note that their fiscal motives eventually traded places.) 

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Suzette’s client’s hypothesis construed that the meaning of his accumulating works - such as Jonker’s oils, and possibly their value - will have altered due to the intentional layering of conceptual complexity – despite, or additionally, by not being produced by his own hand. In order to test this hypothesis, one of the tiny paintings was submitted to an exhibition of ‘Large Artworks’ at the Athenaeum in Port Elizabeth. An accompanying proposal asserted that the acquired significance (and hence their scale) extended beyond the borders of the painting’s frame. Suzette Clarke, artist’s brand strategist, was dispatched to persuade 'Robberg Palm’ onto the Large Artwork exhibition, on the basis of this hypothesis.

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